Alabama Criminal Law Round-Up November 28th

Here are a few of the criminal law stories that occurred around the state of Alabama this past week:

Alabama Criminal Law Round-Up November 28th

Alabama Criminal Law Round-Up November 18th

Here are a few of the criminal law stories that occurred around the state of Alabama this past week:

  • Victims of an auto parts store robbery in Birmingham turned the tables on the suspect when they followed him and exchanged fire. Demetria Dinkins, Jr. fled the scene after crashing his vehicle and was then arrested after attempting to check himself into St. Vincent’s Hospital for the gunshot wounds. Birmingham police charged Dinkins with five counts of first-degree robbery and are holding him on bonds totaling $200,000.
  • Police conducting a traffic stop near a Florence home encountered a suspect with marijuana paraphernalia inside his vehicle. Officers soon made their way to the suspect’s house, where they discovered several marijuana plants as well as two children under the age of six. They arrested a 30-year-old man and 27-year-old woman, charging them with first-degree possession of marijuana, endangering the welfare of a child and exposing children to narcotics. The female suspect, Jacqueline Hamner, was released on a $13,500 bond while the male suspect, Jeremy Hamner, is still in jail.
  • Remains found in McCalla are believed to be the body of a 59-year-old Tuscaloosa man, Morris Davis Watson, who had been reported missing on September 9th. Police arrested two suspects who were identified as Watson’s ex-stepdaughter and her boyfriend. Though the pair were originally charged with stolen property, the fact that Watson’s death was determined to be caused by a gunshot means that the male suspect will be served a murder warrant after he is returned to Tuscaloosa.
Alabama Criminal Law Round-Up November 18th

Alabama Criminal Law Round-Up November 9th

Here are a few of the criminal law stories that occurred around the state of Alabama this past week:

Alabama Criminal Law Round-Up November 9th

What Are The 2016 Candidates’ Thoughts on The Criminal Justice System?

Voting For Leading USA Presidential Candidates on Ballot

With November 8th just four days away, one of the most controversial (or at least most memorable and talked about) presidential races will soon produce the newest Commander-in-Chief for the United States. Either Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump will be inaugurated in January. Here are a few of their views on criminal justice reform that they proposed over their campaign:

On her official campaign website, Hillary Clinton pushes for unity between local police and community members to avoid concerns such as racial profiling and incarceration of nonviolent offenders. She plans to use funds to create and implement police training programs that teach the proper measures for using violent or nonviolent measures as well as adopting mental health initiatives for the nation’s police departments. She hopes to also reform mandatory minimum sentences, specifically for nonviolent offenders, in order to reduce their sentences by half, provide more rehabilitation options, and not allow these types of offenses to count as “strikes” on their records. She vows to end the privatization of prisons so they “may not contribute to over-incarceration.” Secretary Clinton also promises to “ban the box” for job applicants, invest $5 billion in job re-entry programs, and restore voting right to those who were previously incarcerated. She does not always support capital punishment, but seems to make exceptions in extreme cases such as the Oklahoma City bombing by Timothy McVeigh.

In interviews and televised debates, Donald Trump also conveys his opinions on various criminal reform issues. Particularly, he has recently highlighted the use of stop-and-frisk measures as a way to “take the guns away from bad people who shouldn’t have them,” discussing how effective New York City’s policies were despite the fact that the state eventually ruled the act unconstitutional. In terms of profiling, he has often said he would focus on the activities and country of origin of individuals, rather than racial or ethnically-based factors. He believes the stop-and-frisk will lead to the protection of inner-city and African American communities. In response to how he would “heal the racial divide,” he plans to use law and order through the state and federal police forces. Trump says that police experience the most mistreatment and misunderstanding of any workers in America, and he feels they are often too afraid to perform their jobs properly. However, he also believes in “weeding out the problems” of incompetent officers that would further bring division between police and the communities they protect. In addition, Donald Trump supports the death penalty and has been a very vocal proponent of it in years past.

What Are The 2016 Candidates’ Thoughts on The Criminal Justice System?

Alabama Criminal Law Round-Up November 1st

Here are a few of the criminal law stories that occurred around the state of Alabama this past week:

Alabama Criminal Law Round-Up November 1st